Review: Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman

Title: Noughts and Crosses

Author: Malorie Blackman

Pages: 479 Pages

Publisher: Penguin

The Blurb

Two young people are forced to make a stand in this thought-provoking look at racism and prejudice in an alternate society.

Sephy is a Cross — a member of the dark-skinned ruling class. Callum is a Nought — a “colourless” member of the underclass who were once slaves to the Crosses. The two have been friends since early childhood, but that’s as far as it can go. In their world, Noughts and Crosses simply don’t mix. Against a background of prejudice and distrust, intensely highlighted by violent terrorist activity, a romance builds between Sephy and Callum — a romance that is to lead both of them into terrible danger. Can they possibly find a way to be together? 

The Review

I work in a high school library. I have walked past the B shelf a hundred thousand times (probably more) and yet I never picked up Noughts and Crosses. I had read other books by Malorie Blackman and really enjoyed them – Pig-Heart Boy has stuck with me since reading it – yet I just never picked up the book that she is probably best known for. How stupid am I?

A year 9 class that I work with are reading Noughts and Crosses as their set text this year and I wanted to get a head start on it. Only, I couldn’t put it down. I soared through it, barely stopping to eat and drink. Blackman had me on the edge of my seat, my heart was constantly in my throat, I cried, I yelled, I lost the ability to breathe. That is how powerful a writer Blackman is. I have never known a writer to build tension the way she does and man alive she got my heart racing.

Noughts and Crosses is sensational. There are so many amazing ways I could describe it but I would come across as hyperbolic and insincere. The only thing I can say with absolute certainty is that you must read it. It is as relevant know (if not more so) than when it was originally released. 

It should be a crime that a book that has racism as a central theme can be so relevant 20 years after its initial release. Hopefully, stories like Callum’s and Sephy’s can have an impact on today’s youth and make positive changes for the future.

Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman is available now.

For more information regarding Malorie Blackman (@malorieblackman) please visit www.malorieblackman.co.uk.

For more information regarding Penguin (@PenguinUKBooks) please visit www.penguin.co.uk.

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