Love FifteenTitle: Love Fifteen

Author: Peter Nichols

Pages: 200 Pages

Publisher: Troubador Publishing

The Blurb

A bittersweet comedy about an adolescent boy’s affair with a 30-year-old woman that is set in Bristol during World War II.

Theodore Light is a young boy with rich ambition who reaches the tender age of fifteen in 1940. He’s looking forward to being sent to Canada to avoid the blitzes on his home town, Bristol. His childhood dream is to direct Hollywood films, but for now the closest he can get to them is seeing them in a cinema. Being underage, however, makes his dream near impossible – until he meets an older woman that takes a shine to him…

Page-turning drama unfolds when Theodore bunks off from school and stumbles upon a stunning older woman, Mrs Hampton, who offers to accompany him to see a film. During an air raid, Mrs. Hampton offers her flat as shelter, where their relationship intensifies and fondness for each other matures.

This is the story of their taboo affair, played out against a wartime background, as Theodore continues to dream of Hollywood fame and glory.

Love Fifteen is a captivating combination of whirlwind romance and wartime adventure that will be enjoyed by fans of historical fiction and domestic comedy. Author Peter has been inspired by acting and film production which took a prominent role in his life from a young age.

The Review

Oh dear.

I really didn’t like Love Fifteen. I’m sorry. I found this story to be an extremely tedious read. The overall plot had so much potential: Suburban Britain during the war, a young boy on the verge of manhood is shown the ways of love by a lusty older woman. So far, so good. Throw in a dysfunctional family; a mother who is having romantic dalliances whilst her husband is away for weeks on end and a golden child sister whose crown is destined to fall off sooner or later.

See this is a good plot. The writing was not. Reading Love Fifteen felt like swimming through hummus.

This really wasn’t the book for me.

Love Fifteen by Peter Nichols is available now.

For more information regarding Troubador Publishing (@matadorbooks) please visit www.troubador.co.uk.

1 star

A Week in ParisThe Blurb

A captivating story of love, courage and survival set in wartime Paris and the early 1960s, by the bestselling author of The Silent Tide

1961: Born on the day that WW2 broke out, 21-year-old Fay Knox cannot remember her early childhood in London, before she moved to a Norfolk village with her mother, Kitty. Though she has seen a photograph of her father, she does not recall him either. He died, she was told, in an air raid, and their house destroyed along with all their possessions. Why then, on a visit to Paris on tour with her orchestra, does a strange series of events suggest that she spent the war there instead? There is only one clue to follow, an address on the luggage label of an old canvas satchel. But will the truth hurt or heal?

1937: Eugene Knox, a young American doctor, catches sight of 19-year-old Kitty Travers on the day she arrives in Paris, and cannot get her out of his mind. She has come to study the piano at the famed Conservatoire, and lodges at a convent near Notre Dame. Eugene and Kitty will fall in love, marry and have a daughter, but France’s humiliating defeat by Germany is not far behind, and the little family must suffer life under Nazi occupation. Some Parisians keep their heads down and survive, others collaborate with the enemy while others resist. The different actions of Eugene, Kitty and their friends will have devastating consequences that echo down the generations.

The Review

I’ve never been an avid reader of historical novels. In part, this is due to the fact that I only have interest in certain parts of history (I know, I’m awful). I think my aversion to historical fiction, in particular to wartime fiction has been that my mother tends to read nothing but. However, I am not one to be prejudice and I gave Rachel Hore’s A Week in Paris a read.

I must say, A Week in Paris is a wonderful, heartbreaking, and harrowing story of a young family trying to survive occupied France and the repercussions that are still felt nearly two decades later. The characters are wonderfully crafted as is the tale of mystery.

However, I personally found sections of this book a bit of a chore to read. For me, the pacing was all wrong which is a shame because the actual story is rather interesting and the factual element made it all the more compelling.

If you like historical fiction then please give A Week in Paris a read – more so if you are interested in wartime France.

A Week in Paris by Rachel Hore is available now.

35 Stars