Title: I Carried a Watermelon – Dirty Dancing and Me

Author: Katy Brand

Pages: 249 Pages

Publisher: HQ

The Blurb

I Carried a Watermelon is a love story to Dirty Dancing. A warm, witty and accessible look at how Katy Brand’s life-long obsession with the film has influenced her own attitudes to sex, love, romance, rights and responsibilities.

It explores the legacy of the film, from pushing women’s stories to the forefront of commercial cinema, to its ‘Gold Standard’ depiction of abortion according to leading pro-choice campaigners, and its fresh and powerful take on the classic ‘coming of age’ story told from a naïve but idealistic 17-year-old girl’s point of view.

Part memoir based on a personal obsession, part homage to a monster hit and a work of genius, Katy will explore her own memories and experiences, and talk to other fans of the film, to examine its legacy as a piece of filmmaking with a social agenda that many miss on first viewing. One of the most celebrated and viewed films ever made is about to have the time of its life.

The Review

It was the coronavirus isolation of 2020 and everyone was stuck inside and it didn’t occur to me to mind….okay that’s a lie. I was bored (but safe and lucky). So I decided to read I Carried a Watermelon. The reason was two-fold: 1) I like Katy Brand, I think she is funny and 2) I love Dirty Dancing. I don’t just love Dirty Dancing, I LOVE Dirty Dancing. It is a love that a few people have. An obsessive love, a love in which no one can speak badly about Dirty Dancing because I will fall out with them. I got the sense (cleverly through the title of the book and the picture on the cover of Katy Brand brandishing a watermelon) that Katy Brand liked it too.

I Carried a Watermelon is a fantastic memoir – it is funny, light hearted, silly in places but overall it connects with the reader through this shared love of the classic 80s film Dirty Dancing. Brand walks you through her childhood when we relied of video cassettes with the threat of them being worn out or in Brand’s case hidden by her father, the depression – when the remake was made (I wasn’t as brave as Brand – I saw it in snippets, I couldn’t watch the whole thing). But through it all she has this really positive attitude and pro-women-gung-ho-ness about her.

I loved it. I genuinely couldn’t put it down and I am so very jealous that she got to go to the real life Kellerman’s resort.

One thing is for sure, I will not be putting Katy Brand’s I Carried a Watermelon in the corner – that was a bit tenuous but you know what I mean.

I Carried a Watermelon by Katy Brand is available now.

For more information regarding Katy Brand (@KatyFBrand) please visit www.katybrandofficial.com.

For more information regarding HQ (@HQstories) please visit www.hqstories.co.uk.

Title: Deconstructing Dirty Dancing

Author: Stephen Lee Naish

Pages: 89 Pages

Publisher: Zero Books

The Blurb

Renowned film critic Roger Ebert said Dirty Dancing “might have been a decent movie if it had allowed itself to be about anything.” In this broadly researched and accessible text, Stephen Lee Naish sets out to deconstruct and unlock a film that has haunted him for decades, and argues that Dirty Dancing, the 1987 sleeper hit about a young middle-class girl who falls for a handsome working-class dance instructor, is actually about everything. The film is a union of history, politics, sixties and eighties culture, era-defining music, class, gender, and race, and of course features one of the best love stories set to film. Using scene-by-scene analyses, personal interpretation, and comparative study, it’s time to take Dirty Dancing out of the corner and place it under the microscope.

(AMAZON BLURB)

The Review

My love for Dirty Dancing knows no bounds. It is my favourite film of all time and I will watch it whenever it is on television…albeit I will watch the DVD so as not to get cross that they have edited bits out and to alleviate the adverts but I still watch it every time it is on television. I wouldn’t be surprised if I had watched Dirty Dancing over 1000 times.

It is due to this that I am always dubious when someone writes about it. I worry that they are going to try and be disparaging about it. My fiancé is always trying to take it down but after I made him watch it with audio commentary (provided by myself) he realised that nothing was going to shake my love.

Deconstructing Dirty Dancing is a really clever look at Dirty Dancing from an academic point of view and Stephen Lee Naish is not trying to belittle the movie at all. He studies it from a historical, social and political point of view. He takes you on a minute by minute journey and celebrates how much of a brave movie Dirty Dancing is and how it tackles some extreme issues of the time which are scarily still relevant today.

This is definitely one for film fans and Dirty Dancing buffs alike.

Deconstructing Dirty Dancing by Stephen Lee Naish is available now.

For more information regarding Stephen Lee Naish (@RiffsandMeaning) please visit his Twitter page.

For more information regarding Zero Books (@Zer0Books) please visit www.patreon.com/zerobooks.