Title: The Improbability of Love

Author: Hannah Rothschild

Pages: 408 Pages

Publisher: Bloomsbury Books

The Blurb

When lovelorn Annie McDee stumbles across a dirty painting in a junk shop while looking for a present for an unsuitable man, she has no idea what she has discovered. Soon she finds herself drawn unwillingly into the tumultuous London art world, populated by exiled Russian oligarchs, avaricious Sheikas, desperate auctioneers and unscrupulous dealers, all scheming to get their hands on her painting – a lost eighteenth-century masterpiece called ‘The Improbability of Love’. Delving into the painting’s past, Annie will uncover not just an illustrious list of former owners, but some of the darkest secrets of European history – and in doing so she might just learn to open up to the possibility of falling in love again.

The Review

The Improbability of Love is a low key heist novel about the displacement of an expensive piece of art: The Improbability of love. Within the multi-narrative novel we see crooked art dealers, we see relationships blooming, and we also see the difficulty between families.

It is an interesting story, a bit tongue in cheek, but for me it was a bit of a slow burner. Things get more interesting later on in the novel when the origin of the artwork begins to unfold but it did take over half of the book to get there.

The most interesting chapters were the ones told by the painting itself. It sounds strange but the unique voice of The Improbability of Love was witty, entertaining and a little pompous so it is worth a read just for this character alone.

The Improbability of Love by Hannah Rothschild is available now.

For more information regarding Hannah Rothschild (@Hannah71771890) please visit www.hannahrothschild.com.

For more information regarding Bloomsbury Books (@BloomsburyBooks) please visit www.bloomsbury.com.

Title: House of Trelawney

Author: Hannah Rothschild

Pages: 384 Pages

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

The Blurb

The seat of the Trelawney family for over 700 years, Trelawney Castle was once the jewel of the Cornish coast. Each successive Earl spent with abandon, turning the house and grounds into a sprawling, extravagant palimpsest of wings, turrets and follies. But as the centuries passed the Earls of Trelawney, their ambition dulled by generations of pampered living, failed to develop other skills. Now in 2008 the house – its paintings and furniture sold off to pay death duties, its grounds diminished, the gardens choked with weeds – has begun to resemble its owners: faded, crumbling, and out-of-date.

Jane, the put-upon wife of the current Earl, Kitto, scraping a life for her children and in-laws in a few draughty rooms of the big house, is trapped by Trelawney Castle; while Blaze, Kitto’s sister, has made a killing in the City – and a complete turkey of her personal life. Long-estranged, the two women are brought back together when a letter arrives; and soon after it, an unwelcome young guest. Grudgingly reunited, Blaze and Jane must band together to take charge of their new charge – and save the house of Trelawney.

With formidable sharpness, delicious irreverence and a very wicked wit, House of Trelawney is a glorious send-up of recession Britain and its carnival of bastard bankers and down-at-heel toffs. An eccentric gem of a satire, and an unexpected romance, it asks how we are connected, what we owe to one another, and how to carry on existing in a world which has outgrown us.

The Review

The House of Trelawney has been in the family for 800 years but the current occupants have let it fall to wreck and ruin and now it looks like it is about to end the centuries long tradition. The house isn’t just made of bricks and mortar though. It is also built upon secrets and lies.

The House of Trelawney is a family saga that does have you guessing to the very end. The multi perspective narrative means that you are constantly kept on your toes. Strangely, the story is a bit of a slow burner. There isn’t a pressing need to turn the page but you do enjoy the steady stream of new information.  I enjoyed this story. I am not sure what I was expecting from it but I enjoyed the story none-the-less.

House of Trelawney by Hannah Rothschild is available now.

For more information regarding Hannah Rothschild (@Hannah71771890) please visit www.hannahrothschild.com.

For more information regarding Bloomsbury Publishing (@BloomsburyBooks) please visit www.bloomsbury.com.