The End We Start WithTitle: The End We Start From

Author: Megan Hunter

Pages: 140 Pages

Publisher: Grove Atlantic

The Blurb

The End We Start From is strange and powerful, and very apt for these uncertain times. I was moved, terrified, uplifted – sometimes all three at once. It takes skill to manage that, and Hunter has a poet’s understanding of how to make each word count.”—Tracy Chevalier

Pre-empted by publishers around the world within days of the 2016 London Book Fair, The End We Start From heralds the arrival of Megan Hunter, a dazzling and unique literary talent. Hunter’s debut is a searing original, a modern-day parable of rebirth and renewal, of maternal bonds, and the instinct to survive and thrive in the absence of all that’s familiar.

As London is submerged below flood waters, a woman gives birth to her first child, Z. Days later, she and her baby are forced to leave their home in search of safety. They head north through a newly dangerous country seeking refuge from place to place, shelter to shelter, to a desolate island and back again. The story traces fear and wonder, as the baby’s small fists grasp at the first colours he sees, as he grows and stretches, thriving and content against all the odds.

Written with poise and poeticism, The End We Start From is an indelible and elemental first book—a lyrical vision of the strangeness and beauty of new motherhood, and a portentous tale of endurance in the face of ungovernable change.

The Review

The End We Start From by Megan Hunter is a dystopian fiction lover’s dream. Set on the road, a family try to survive when their home of London is flooded beyond recognition. This story of survival is twisted and haunting.

Megan Hunter’s stop/start style of writing really connects the reader to the chaos and insecurity being felt by the main characters. The lack of character names again adds to the disjointed quality and you can’t help but feel the disparate nature between adults who knew what the world was like before and the children who will only ever know this crazy fight for survival.

Considering that The End We Start From is only a short book it does have a serious bite to it. I was left thinking about it long after it had ended.

The End We Start From by Megan Hunter is available in November 2017.

For more information regarding Megan Hunter please visit her Twitter page (@meganfnhunter)

For more information regarding Grove Atlantic (@groveatlantic) please visit

3 Stars


An airborne flu virus has been unleashed in Canada. People who contract the illness are dead within 48 hours. People all across Canada and America have been told to flee. No other advice has been given. Flee. Save yourselves.

Fast forward twenty years. Survivors of the modern day plague are still trying to make sense of the virus that has killed loved ones, severely depleted the population and forcefully created pocketed communities across the land. Some of these communities are peaceful. Some are not.

In a time of much confusion, who do you trust?


Firstly, let me say that Station Eleven is not the type of book I would normally be compelled to read and admittedly I was drawn to the pretty cover. I was thankful when I was an approved reviewer for this book on NetGalley and even more grateful now that I have had the chance to read it.

It is phenomenal. That is a pretty big statement to make but let me tell you my reasons.

This book terrified me. My heart was set racing at several points due to the sheer fear that it instilled inside of me. It made me question things. Like, what if an epidemic like this actually happened? Would I have the strength to survive? To hunt? To kill? Would I fall apart and just wait for death? And rather materialistically – would I be able to survive in a world without all the luxuries that I have become accustomed to? Ah, le problemes du premiere monde!

What was fascinating about Station Eleven is that Emily St John Mandel has managed to create a dystopian future from describing how life used to be. The non-linear tale added to the anguish and the confusion of the situation. What was also very clever about the story was how the lives of the survivors linked without seeming contrived or too neat. I think this was helped by the cast of characters that came and went so seamlessly in the initial post epidemic scenes.

If you like dystopian fiction then this definitely needs to be added to your TBR pile and if it doesn’t sound like your kind of thing then I would still recommend that you give it a go. Station Eleven certainly gripped my attention.

Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel is available now.

You can follow Emily St John Mandel on Twitter @EmilyMandel