Title: More than a Woman

Author: Caitlin Moran

Pages: 277 Pages

Publisher: Ebury Press

The Blurb

The author of the international bestseller How to Be a Woman returns with another “hilarious neo-feminist manifesto” (NPR) in which she reflects on parenting, middle-age, marriage, existential crises—and, of course, feminism.

A decade ago, Caitlin Moran burst onto the scene with her instant bestseller, How to Be a Woman, a hilarious and resonant take on feminism, the patriarchy, and all things womanhood. Moran’s seminal book followed her from her terrible 13th birthday through adolescence, the workplace, strip-clubs, love, and beyond—and is considered the inaugural work of the irreverent confessional feminist memoir genre that continues to occupy a major place in the cultural landscape.

Since that publication, it’s been a glorious ten years for young women: Barack Obama loves Fleabag, and Dior make “FEMINIST” t-shirts. However, middle-aged women still have some nagging, unanswered questions: Can feminists have Botox? Why isn’t there such a thing as “Mum Bod”? Why do hangovers suddenly hurt so much? Is the camel-toe the new erogenous zone? Why do all your clothes suddenly hate you? Has feminism gone too far? Will your To Do List ever end? And WHO’S LOOKING AFTER THE CHILDREN?

As timely as it is hysterically funny, this memoir/manifesto will have readers laughing out loud, blinking back tears, and redefining their views on feminism and the patriarchy. More Than a Woman is a brutally honest, scathingly funny, and absolutely necessary take on the life of the modern woman—and one that only Caitlin Moran can provide. 

The Review

I am a little bit in love with Caitlin Moran. Okay, this is an understatement. I love her that much that I know the my gentleman friend would understand if I left him for her (please don’t ask me to). I truly believe that she is my patronus and that one day if evil should befall me and I should call on her that she would be by my side, fag in hand, sarcastic comment at the ready. That is just how much I love her. In my eyes, she can do no wrong. For that reason alone I knew I would love More than a Woman. Fortunately for Caitlin Moran, her writing warrants that love.

In More than a Woman we see the more grown up Caitlin Moran. She has changed in the past 10 years since How to be a Woman was released. Her opinions have changed, her lifestyle has changed, many things are different now but what is great about Caitlin Moran is that she is willing to accept change, admit that she has changed her mind and still own it. She is an example to us all.

Some of the later chapters did leave me feeling broken and there is a sadness that maybe isn’t seen as much in her earlier works. It makes you want to wrap her up in a great big hug and tell her that it will all be okay. 

I really loved More than a Woman and I think Caitlin Moran is consistently brave with her writing. It is for that reason that I believe people love and believe in her.

More than a Woman by Caitlin Moran is available now.

For more information regarding Caitlin Moran (@caitlinmoran) please visit www.caitlinmoran.co.uk.

For more information regarding Ebury Press (@EburyPublishing) please visit their Twitter page.

Title: My Teenage Diary

Time: 19 Hours Five minutes

The Blurb

Forty-five episodes from Series 1-8 of the Sony Award-winning BBC Radio comedy show, hosted by Rufus Hound.

In this hilarious and revealing show, host Rufus Hound invites his guests to revisit their formative years by dusting off their intimate teenage diaries and reading them out in public for the very first time. From terrible poetry, musings on pop music and cringeworthy crushes to fond recollections of schooldays and exotic holidays, to poignant and searingly honest confessions, these extracts reveal the secret thoughts, feelings and experiences of a host of well-known celebrities – before they became famous.

Among the contributors are Richard Herring, Shappi Khorsandi, Sheila Hancock, Meera Syal, Arabella Weir, Robert Webb, Caitlin Moran, Ken Livingstone, Terry Wogan, Alex Horne, Lionel Shriver, Michael Rosen, Ian Rankin, Debbie McGee and John Finnemore.

As they delve into the past and reflect on their youth, will they be filled with nostalgia or embarrassment? What would they say to their younger selves? And what song will they choose to sum up their teenage years? Find out all this – and a lot more besides – in these surprising, insightful and hugely entertaining shows.

(AMAZON BLURB)

The Review

I have been delving into the world of audiobooks recently and what I have come to realise is that I prefer audiobooks when they are a) books I have already read but want to come back to or b) non-fiction.

With that in mind, I spent a few weeks dipping in and out of My Teenage Diary; a compilation of stories that featured on the BBC radio program of the same name presented by Rufus Hound. The premise of the show is that well known celebrities come on air with their teenage diaries and reveal who they once were.

It is absolutely charming and funny and silly. It is great because it makes you realise just how awkward some of your favourite celebrities are and in some cases how little they have changed. Personal highlights for me were Caitlin Moran (she is my Patronus) and Robert Webb.

If you are going to spend your hard earned dollars on any audiobook this year then make sure it is My Teenage Diary.

My Teenage Diary is available now in book form and in audiobook.

 

 

Title: How to Be Famous

Author: Caitlin Moran

Pages: 320 Pages

Publishers: Ebury Press

The Blurb

I’m Johanna Morrigan, and I live in London in 1995, at the epicentre of Britpop. I might only be nineteen, but I’m wise enough to know that everyone around me is handling fame very, very badly.

My unrequited love, John Kite, has scored an unexpected Number One album, then exploded into a Booze And Drugs HellTM – as rockstars do. And my new best friend – the maverick feminist Suzanne Banks, of The Branks – has amazing hair, but writer’s block and a rampant pill problem. So I’ve decided I should become a Fame Doctor. I’m going to use my new monthly column for The Face to write about every ridiculous, surreal, amazing aspect of a million people knowing your name.

But when my two-night-stand with edgy comedian Jerry Sharp goes wrong, people start to know my name for all the wrong reasons. ‘He’s a vampire. He destroys bright young girls. Also, he’s a total dick’ Suzanne warned me. But by that point, I’d already had sex with him. Bad sex.
Now I’m one of the girls he’s trying to destroy.
He needs to be stopped.

But how can one woman stop a bad, famous, powerful man?

 (AMAZON BLURB)

The Review

A few months ago I picked up Caitlin Moran’s How to Be a Girl off my bookshelf to read. It had been languishing there for about a year and a half and so I decided to give it a read. I was angry at myself afterwards because I bloody loved it. I can’t believe I had not read it yet. The only good thing about this was that I didn’t have to wait long for the sequel How to Be Famous to be published. Hurrah.

I pre-ordered How to Be Famous and waited patiently for my postman to deliver it and whilst I had promised myself that I could read it over the summer when I was off work I just couldn’t wait and I started it immediately.

And you know what?…I bloody loved this book too.

In the further adventures of Dolly Wilde we see a more grown up if not really more mature young lady now living in London. We watch as Dolly makes more mistakes on the path to finding herself. We also see her become more staunchly feminist and we watch as she sets about trying to change the music industry from inside out.

Dolly Wilde is still the loveable sometimes hapless protagonist that we have come to love but this time we see her become more independent. There were times when I had to close the book because sadly Dolly was doing things that I know once I had read about them I couldn’t unread. That is the power of Caitlin Moran. She made me care for Dolly Wilde as if she was a real person, as if she was my friend.

I cannot praise How to Be a Girl and How to Be Famous any higher than I have. They are both contenders for my favourite book of the year. I wish there were more books of this calibre available to young women today.

How to Be Famous by Caitlin Moran is available now.

For more information regarding Caitlin Moran (@caitlinmmoran) please visit www.caitlinmoran.co.uk.

For more information regarding Ebury Press (@EburyPublishing) please visit www.penguinrandomhouse.co.uk/publishers/eburypublishing.

How to Build a GirlTitle: How to Build a Girl

Author: Caitlin Moran

Pages: 354 Pages

Publisher: Ebury Press

The Blurb

My name’s Johanna Morrigan. I’m fourteen, and I’ve just decided to kill myself.

I don’t really want to die, of course! I just need to kill Johanna, and build a new girl. Dolly Wilde will be everything I want to be, and more! But as with all the best coming-of-age stories, it doesn’t exactly go to plan…

(AMAZON BLURB)

The Review

My favourite genre of book or movie or, heck, even song, is one with a coming of age story at its heart. I love watching a character grow and develop and learn and just become who they are meant to be in this little fictional world. It makes my heart swell bigger than the Grinch’s. And this is exactly what I got from Caitlin Moran’s How to Build a Girl.

Now I know I am a little late to the game on this one but to be fair I have a million books and there is, as of yet, not been a day added to the week allocated for just reading so you will have to forgive me. However, as I pressed pre-order on the sequel to How to Build A Girl (How to Be Famous – out in June) I decided to bump it to the top of the TBR pile and oh my wow I have fallen in love.

Besides being, as I have said, a coming of age story, How to Build a Girl is also a socio-economic study of class. In particular, working class status and what it means to be poor. Moran has made no secret about her unconventional upbringing and you can see how much of her heart and soul is infused in this story and how it actually takes someone who knows about class issues from a realistic vantage to be able to discuss them eruditely.

Moran uses the music of the times to forward the story along and completely immerses you in her world and I, for one, didn’t want to leave. Johanna Morrigan – our protagonist – really is a fictional heroine. One I wish I had to look up to when I was younger. And even though Caitlin Moran could write about the wing span of midgey flies and I would read it because I love her writing style I can honestly say that How to Build a Girl has taken the number one spot as my book of the year so far.

How to Build a Girl by Caitlin Moran is available now.

For more information regarding Caitlin Moran (@caitlinmoran) please visit www.caitlinmoran.co.uk.

For more information regarding Ebury Publishing (@EburyPublishing) please visit www.penguinrandomhouse.co.uk/publishers/ebury.

5 Stars

MoranifestoThe Blurb

‘I’ve lived through ten iOS upgrades on my Mac – and that’s just something I use to much about on Twitter. Surely capitalism is due an upgrade or two?’

When Caitlin Moran sat down to choose her favourite pieces for her new book she realised that they all seemed to join up. Turns out, it’s the same old problems and the same old ass-hats.

Then she thought of the word ‘Moranifesto’, and she knew what she had to do…

This is Caitlin’s engaging and amusing rallying call for our times. Combining the best of her recent columns with lots of new writing unique to this book, Caitlin deals with topics as pressing and diverse as 1980s swearing, benefits, boarding schools, and why the internet is like a drunken toddler.

And whilst never afraid to address the big issues of the day – such as Benedict Cumberbatch and duffel coats – Caitlin also makes a passionate effort to understand our 21st century society and presents us with her ‘Moranifesto’ for making the world a better place.

The polite revolution starts here! Please.

The Review

I firmly believe (and have done for some time) that I am a little bit in love with Caitlin Moran.

You see, I read her writings or listen to her in interviews and I think to myself “Dammit, yes Caitlin! You have expressed my thoughts far more eloquently than have now let’s go out for a pow-wow and maybe a game of air hockey.” – why the air hockey? Couldn’t say, but I do know that Caitlin and I would shoot the shit something wicked in a musty old arcade.

If I could write…or, indeed, think 3% as astutely as Caitlin Moran does then I would consider myself to be very lucky. She gets me that riled up with optimistic vibes that I almost want to befriend her and encourage her to run for president. The fact that she is British, be damned! I believe she could do it; I know she would win.

Ok, enough fangirling (don’t worry, there may be some more later). Let us look at her latest book: Moranifesto. It is a glorious collection of her articles and it really does invite you to intimately press your nose between the pages of her mellifluous mind. It is a must for avid “woMoran’s” – ok I tried to create a “Cumberbitch” tag name and it didn’t quite work out but you get what I mean – and also for the “Moranovice” < – admittedly, I am a little proud of that one.

Personally, my favourite articles included: “I Can’t Stop Listening to ‘Get Lucky’”, “Everyone Fancies Britain Right Now”, “A Woman’s Monthly Faultiness”, “My Lady Festival Advice”, “Russell T Davies – The Man Who Changed the World, Just a Little Bit”, “Why Can’t Life be More Like a Musical?”, and “All the Lists of My Life”

This is not an exhaustive list and to be fair it doesn’t do justice to just how brilliant Moranifesto is. This is a book that should be issued to teenagers who are trying to figure things out and trying to form their own opinion away from the beliefs that they have been born into. This book could have been called The Things I Wished I Had Known. Where was this book when I was growing up? is the only negative thing I have to say about Moranifesto. This previously gawky teenager could have used it. I implore everyone to pick up a copy of Moranifesto because it is a treasure trove of fantastic writing. I cannot recommend it enough…and now we have the return of the fangirl.

One final thing, Moranifesto gave me one of my proudest moments as an aunty when my one year old niece picked it up and said “book”. I thought to myself, “Yes, I will make a feminist/humanist out of you.”

Moranifesto by Caitlin Moran is available now.

Follow Caitlin Moran (@caitlinmoran) on Twitter.

5 Stars