Man, last week was not my best. I didn’t get through half the books that I wanted to read. I blame the fact that I have to work. Yep, the world would be a greater place if I had lots of money and free time. Ahhh, a girl can dream.

Anywho, the books that I did manage to get through included:

The Supreme Macaroni Company by Adriana Trigiani

1,411 QI Facts to Knock You Sideways by John Lloyd, John Mitchinson and James Harkin

The Snow Globe by Kristen Harmel

A Song for Ella Grey by David Almond

Actually, to be fair four books is quite good.

I’m currently reading three books, they are

Us by David Nicholls (I’m taking my time with this one, I want to treasure very last page)

The First Year: Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis by Jill Sklar (I figure I should probably learn a bit more about my lifelong chronic illness)

A Christmas to Remember by Jenny Hale (The first book in my new seasonal feature)

Other books I have to try and read this week include:

Alice + Freda Forever by Alexis Coe (NetGalley Review) (208 pages)

Fat Chance by Nick Spalding (Net Galley Review) (289 pages)

Love and Other Unknown Variables by Shannon Lee Alexander (NetGalley Review) (352 pages)

Seven Letters from Paris by Samantha Verant (NetGalley Review) (288 pages)

Rocks by Joe Perry (NetGalley Review) (432 pages)

Reunion by Hannah Pittard (NetGalley Review) (288 pages)

Althea and Oliver by Christina Moracho (NetGalley Review) (384 pages)

A Week in Paris by Rachel Hore (NetGalley Review) (358 pages)

Now this may seem like a lot of books but I only have one for review next week so I will pick up the pace then.

Also, this week it is a lovely book bloggers birthday, everyone should show Clare over at A Book and Tea some birthday love.

Have an awesome reading week.

L x

Ps I hang my head in shame, my NetGalley review percentage went down. Woe to the people.

Synopsis

In this modern day retelling of the myth of Eurydice and Orpheus we meet best friends Ella and Claire who spend their youth trying to grow up quicker. Things take an interesting turn when Ella falls for vagabond Orpheus. Their union signifies the end of Claire and Ella’s youth and also brings their impending lives fully into view.

Review

I was so keen to read this book. Having read Almond’s work before I am familiar and I awe how he can take the normal and make it appear mystical and atmospheric. Add to this the fact that the tale of Orpheus and Eurydice is my favourite myth you can see why I was so eager to devour this story.

Sadly, it didn’t blow me away. In fact, having finished the book I’m kind of at a loss to describe how I feel. Heck, all the elements were there; the atmospheric nature of his writing, the story that needed to be told, the amazing way in which Almond can captivate you – it all just didn’t quite connect for me.

I’m a little bit disappointed.

Give it a read and let me know what you think.

The Song for Ella Grey by David Almond is available now.

ella greyy

Synopsis

When Valentine agrees to marry Gianluca on the roof of her New York home little does she realise just how much her life will change. As she faces the everyday problems of marriage, motherhood and being a business woman Valentine realises that the whole world does not revolve around her and her family.

Valentine learns the art of compromise, she learns that life is for living not for working and she also learns that there are more important things in life than being successful. But has she learnt all this too late?

Review

On Goodreads, Amazon and NetGalley I issued this book with a four star rating. I believe that it deserves this high rating because it is a beautifully told story which gives the reader an insight into the inner workings of marriage, an Italian immigrant lifestyle and a close family unit.

The storyline flowed well, you felt like you went on a journey with the characters. You became elated when they did, you became frustrated when they didn’t act the way you knew that they should and you hurt when they hurt.

It was good for all of these reasons and it is with these reasons that I encourage you to read this story and make up your own mind.

However, I can’t say that I fully connected with the book. I recognise that it is written really well but something just didn’t sit well with me. I wish I could pinpoint exactly what that was but I genuinely don’t have any particular reason for disliking it. So I don’t. Equally, I couldn’t give you a reason why I liked it either. It has left me feeling very indifferent.

Give it a go and let me know what you think.

The Supreme Macaroni Company by Adriana Trigiani is available now.

The Supreme Macaroni Company

Synopsis

When Valentine agrees to marry Gianluca on the roof of her New York home little does she realise just how much her life will change. As she faces the everyday problems of marriage, motherhood and being a business woman Valentine realises that the whole world does not revolve around her and her family.

Valentine learns the art of compromise, she learns that life is for living not for working and she also learns that there are more important things in life than being successful. But has she learnt all this too late?

Review

On Goodreads, Amazon and NetGalley I issued this book with a four star rating. I believe that it deserves this high rating because it is a beautifully told story which gives the reader an insight into the inner workings of marriage, an Italian immigrant lifestyle and a close family unit.

The storyline flowed well, you felt like you went on a journey with the characters. You became elated when they did, you became frustrated when they didn’t act the way you knew that they should and you hurt when they hurt.

It was good for all of these reasons and it is with these reasons that I encourage you to read this story and make up your own mind.

However, I can’t say that I fully connected with the book. I recognise that it is written really well but something just didn’t sit well with me. I wish I could pinpoint exactly what that was but I genuinely don’t have any particular reason for disliking it. So I don’t. Equally, I couldn’t give you a reason why I liked it either. It has left me feeling very indifferent.

Give it a go and let me know what you think.

The Supreme Macaroni Company by Adriana Trigiani is available now.

The Supreme Macaroni Company

This has been a very exciting book week. Oh yes, I am a very happy bunny for this is the week of my birth and good book things happened during this week.

As part of my birthday presents (which are still coming even though my birthday was Saturday) I received:

Apple and Rain by Sarah Crossen

How to be Parisian: Wherever You Are by Anne Berest, Audrey Diwan, Caroline de Maigret and Sophie Mas

But even more exciting is that I was one of the lucky ten people to receive a signed hardback first edition copy of Us by David Nicholls from the wonderful people at BookBridgr. Seriously, I squealed at the postman and then nearly wept with happiness.

Now I did manage to get through a few books this week but not all of them were for review. Some were just books I wanted to read:

Revelation Space by Alistair Reynolds (I have a new found respect for science fiction writers byt it still is not my favourite of genres)

Michael Jackson’s Dangerous by Susan Fast

Liar and Spy by Rebecca Stead

Who is Tom Ditto by Danny Wallace

Lily Does LA by Nichola Doherty

I am currently midway through The Supreme Macaroni Company by Adriana Trigiani. I’ve enjoyed all the books that I have read this week.

This week on my to-read list has to include Us by David Nicholls but the other books that are due for review are:

An American Duchess by Sharon Page (NetGalley Review) (382 pages)

Mademoiselle by Rhonda K Garelick (NetGalley Review) (608 pages)

The Wonder of All Things by Jason Mott (NetGalley Review) (304 pages)

A Pretty Mess: An Astonville Novel by Carla Caruso (NetGalley Review) (260 pages)

How to Climb the Eiffel Tower by Elizabeth Hein (NetGalley Review) (328 pages)

A Song for Ella Grey by David Almond (NetGalley Review) (293 pages)

1,411 QI Facts by John Lloyd, John Mitchinson and James Harin (NetGalley Review) (400 pages)

Ayoade on Ayoade by Richard Ayoade (NetGalley Review) (400 pages)

Let’s face it, I am probably not going to get through all of these but I will, as always, give it a go.

This week will see a new festive feature make its debut on LisaTalksAbout.com. Since there are only thirteen weeks until Christmas (thus making it twelve weeks until Christmas) I plan to review a seasonal book each week. Keep your eyes peeled this week for the list of books that will be read in this feature.

Anywho, I hope you all have an excellent book week.

L x x

Ps – I only managed to get my NetGalley review percentage up to 25.9% – that is only an increase of 0.7% – efforts must be doubled!