Title: We Are Inevitable

Author: Gayle Forman

Pages: 288 Pages

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children’s

The Blurb

A heartbreaking story about finding yourself and your people, from the bestselling author of If I StayPerfect for fans of The Perks of Being a Wallflower, John Green and Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist.

‘I got this whole-body feeling . . . it was like a message from future me to present me, telling me that in some way we weren’t just bound to happen, that we had, in some sense, already happened. It felt . . . inevitable.’

So far, the inevitable hasn’t worked out so well for Aaron Stein. While his friends have gone to college and moved on with their lives, Aaron’s been left behind in the Cascade Mountains of Washington State, running a failing bookshop with his dad, Ira. What he needs is a lucky break, the good kind of inevitable.

And then he meets Hannah. Incredible Hannah – magical, musical, brave and clever. Could she be the answer? And could they – their relationship, their meeting – possibly be the inevitable Aaron’s been waiting for?

The Review

So…it wasn’t my favourite Gayle Forman novel.

We Are Inevitable is the story of Aaron Stein. He is an old soul in a young body. He has seen things and dealt with things that no one should have to at his age. Drugs, losing a family member, the breakdown of his parents marriage and he is just trying to hold it all together. Parallel to this, Aiden is trying to keep the family bookstore afloat.

A lot for any one person to be dealing with.

So all of this I am okay with. There was the additional romance story line which again was nice but I felt that both stories were fighting for poll position. I did not know which story I was rooting for. I felt pulled but not necessarily in a good way.

It was a nice story but I think after reading some of Gayle Forman’s other books I personally was expecting more.

We Are Inevitable by Gayle Forman is available now.

For more information regarding Gayle Forman (@gayleforman) please visit her Twitter page.

For more information regarding Simon & Schuster Children’s (@SimonKIDS) please visit www.simonanschuster.com/kids.

The Blurb

‘My name is Flick and these are the images of my disconnected life, my forgettable weeks and unforgettable weekends. I am one of the disaffected youth.’

Marooned by a lack of education (and lack of anything better to do), Will Flicker, a.k.a. “Flick,” spends most days pondering the artistry behind being a stoner, whether Pepsi is better than Coke, and how best to get clear of his tiny, one-horse suburb. But Flick senses there’s something else out there waiting for him, and the sign comes in the form of the new girl in town—a confident, unconventionally beautiful girl named Rainbow. As their relationship develops, Flick finds himself torn between the twisted loyalty he feels to his old life and the pull of freedom that Rainbow represents.

The Review

Having previously read (and loved) Golden Boy by Abigail Tarttelin I was excited to see what her previous novel had to offer. Fortunately for me, Flick is an excellent story.

Without trying to make comparisons between this and Golden Boy (because believe me it would be a difficult thing to do – it would be like comparing a tree with a unicorn) I do have to comment on the growth that you can see in Tarttelin’s writing. That is not to say that Flick isn’t well written – it is ridiculously good – but having read both books in the wrong order I can definitely see how Tarttelin’s writing has matured.

Flick has all the angsty high school drama that you would expect from a cast of characters who are all still in their teens – and then some. To liken it to a teenage Trainspotting wouldn’t be wrong. It has all the elements required to be similar to the Irvine Welsh classic – starting with the sassy narration.

Flick, our protagonist, has a disaffected way of looking at life. Having lived the working class life his whole life he sees no glorious future in staying in his home town. However, dreams for bigger better things are not something that the working class kids should aspire to – because for the people of small seaside town of Cleveland, it just ain’t gonna happen!

Tartellin’s voice as a writer is amazing. You feel compelled to read her stories because she has such a gritty grip on the nuances of her characters, their situations and the society they live in. She is one of the better contemporary writers we have and more people should know about and celebrate her work.

Flick by Abigail Tarttelin is available now.

You can follow Abigail Tarttelin (@abigailsbrain) on Twitter.

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