Synopsis

Amalia is living the dream; renting an apartment in New York (albeit a flat share), working towards her degree; she has great friends and a gorgeous boyfriend and plans to spend the summer in Brazil. What could possibly go wrong?

Well, falling for her friend Michael probably wasn’t the best idea. However, as she pushes her feelings for Michael aside the rest of her world crumbles around her. Her boyfriend Nick dumps her, she systematically argues with her friends and she starts neglecting her college work.

On the plus side, Michael starts showing her some attention…even though he has a girlfriend.

Will Amalia be able sort her life out?

Review

Firstly, let me say this book had a lot of potential. It has a classic storyline of girl-has-boy, girl-loses-boy, girl-finds-new-boy as she discovers something about herself. The problem is that I failed to care about the characters because the plot was undeveloped. Everything happened at warp speed and there was not enough processing time given.

For example, Amalia was completely in love with her boyfriend but then by the end of chapter one she was in love – not just was attracted to – another character. So whilst we are meant to believe that Amalia was in love with Michael she seems overly devastated when Nick breaks up with her. It was inconsistencies like this (and plenty of others) that made the book uncomfortable to read.

Besides this, the text was littered with silly spelling mistakes that broke my concentration. A reader should not spend time correcting the grammar of the writer.

Overall, the book had potential to be something light hearted and enjoyable, however, due to inconsistencies in the text I found it to be an underdeveloped story that needed much more work before publication.

What Happens to Men when they Move to Manhattan? by Jill Knapp is available July 24th 2014

Men Manhattan

Hudson has it all figured out. He is going to be a doctor; he already has his admissions interview with the Dean of the University of Mississippi. Everything is going according to plan However, when Leila pulls into Hudson’s fathers mechanic shop, he knew his life was changed forever. He couldn’t say how or why but he knew she was special.

Bree is a drifter. She wanders up and down lonely highways night after night thumbing for a lift. She keeps herself to herself, distancing herself from her past. She is a tough kid with protective emotional barriers surrounding her. That is until she meets Leila. Leila somehow brings out the truth in Bree. Bree swiftly learns that no matter where you run to your past will always be one step behind you.

On Elliot’s prom night he is nearly run over by Leila. He is already having a pretty crappy night but being run over takes the biscuit. Leila is the driver that nearly mowed him down. That night she becomes his saviour convincing him not to give up on love. She pushes him into a series of wacky adventures (much like the ones that happen in the 80s movies that he keeps referencing) to try and win the heart of the girl he loves.

Sonia feels likes she is betraying the memory of her boyfriend. Sam died of a brain haemorrhage but his family have kept Sonia at the heart of it. However, Sonia feels guilty because she has fallen for another man. So now she is torn between her new boyfriend and her ex’s family. It all comes to a head when they are both taking part in the wedding of Sam’s sister; it is too much for her to take so Sonia runs away. During her turmoil she bumps into Leila who becomes a confident and a superhero trying to get Sonia back to the wedding.

Firstly, let me say I loved this book, not only the unique and quirky stories that were in it but also the clever style in which it was written. I loved that Leila, who was clearly the protagonist, was presented as a secondary character in the lives of the people she met.

What I also loved was that all the characters all had something missing. Something that they were searching for and that it took Leila, who was arguably missing for the largest thing, to help the other characters to find/realise it. The stories had a clever fluidity about them.  It is almost a book about the kindness and good nature of strangers along with the surprises that the people that you love can give you.

What can definitely be said is that YA is currently kicking ass in the fiction world.

Let’s Get Lost by Adi Alsaid is available from August 1st 2014

Lets Get Los

Due to my excessive gluttonous nature when it comes to all things book like I excessively clicked the request button on NetGalley and ended up with a butt load of books to read. Yes, I know that I have an over flowing kindle and no less than four book shelves but hey I have learned my lesson the hard way…kind of. Ok, so yes I keep checking NetGalley for the latest offering but really I think we can all agree that this isn’t my fault. It is in fact the fault of the publishing groups that keep on saying yes to me (if any of you are reading this please don’t stop…I love you).

That being said I have decided to take control. I have seven books that I am going to try and read over the next week that are due for release and hopefully if I get those read I will be able to go back to the list of books that have already been published but I have yet to review them.

The books on this week’s list are:

Men Manhattan

 

 

 

 

 

What Happens to Men when they Move to Manhattan? by Jill Knapp

Published:   24th July 2014

Lets Get Los

 

 

 

 

Let’s Get Lost by Adi Alsaid

Published:   29th July 2014

before You

 

 

 

 

Before You by Amber Hart

Published:   29th July 2014

since you've been gone

 

 

 

 

Since You’ve Been Gone by Anouska Knight

Published:   29th July 2014

The atlas of us pb font

 

 

 

 

The Atlas of Us by Tracy Buchanan

Published:   31st July 2014

Where Kive ies

 

 

 

 

Where Love Lies by Julie Cohen

Published:   31st July 2014

what-would-mary-berry-do-978144725349501

 

 

 

 

What Would Mary Berry Do? by Claire Sandy

Published:   31st July 2014

 

Wish me luck J

Russian born Alena has decided to leave her country to come to the UK to find work. Like many migrants, Alena believes that the answer to hers and her family’s financial woes lies in the opportunity laden London. Having had her work placement set up by a family friend Alena travels to the UK full of optimism and dreams of a better life that includes financial stability, opportunity and designer clothes. What Alena isn’t prepared for is that her dream is a fallacy. Nor is she prepared for her dream to become a nightmare.

Someone well versed in the woes of everyday life in the UK is Dave. Dave is trying to get through each day under the radar; just do his job, get paid and go home. This is a rigmarole that suits the quiet life that he craves. He once had dreams of travel but all that has passed now. However, a chance encounter with Alena throws his world completely off kilter.

Can Dave’s peaceful nature quiet and calm the storm that is Alena’s life?

I won’t lie to you Thirst is a hard novel to read. Not because it is composed of difficult vernacular or in a different language but purely because Kerry Hudson gives the full nitty gritty on a dark and sinister topic; that topic being human trafficking and having immigrants being sold into the sex trade. At times I felt as if my heart was literally breaking for Alena. What made it worse is that she seemed to be unable to forgive herself for her situation; almost like she believed she deserved to be treated like a piece of meat on a market stall. It was truly harrowing.

But this is what makes Hudson such a good writer. She had my heart in my mouth with the desperation of Alena’s situation.

Dave’s story somewhat parallel’s Alena’s in the fact that they both get themselves into situations that they feel that they have no control over. Dave is trying to fulfil the wishes of his dying mother and gets himself trapped by a set of circumstances that were never part of his life plan. Both of the characters are trapped. Not only by what life puts in their way but how they both feel responsible for the way things are.

Their love story is lovely to follow. I think what makes it so enjoyable is the coy innocence of it all. You see them both giving the bare minimum of themselves away, slowly peeling away layers as their relationship grows. It was rather lovely to read.

Thirst is a quirky love story but be warned, if you read books for pure escapism then this book isn’t for you as it does deal with difficult subjects and has a very real insight into the sinister underbelly of the life that some immigrants face.

Thirst by Kerry Hudson is available now.

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Ove is a man who is set in his ways. He has a routine that he sticks to daily. He is angered by people who pay no heed to the rules. He is grumpy, cantankerous and a right old curmudgeon. He is also a man with more yesterdays than tomorrows.

The thing with Ove is that he dislikes change and all of a sudden everything in his life is changing. He has new interfering neighbours; his working hours have been cut due to his age and he cannot get his head round new fangled technology. Ove is a simple man. However, all the recent changes begin to open him up to a word of possibilities – possibilities that Ove reluctantly begins to accept.

Can Ove open himself up fully to these changes?

I was initially dubious about this book. I saw similarities to Mr Frederickson from Disney’s Up and if I am really honest I saw similarities to my own granddad who spends his days bemoaning that things aren’t like they used to be. It was through these similarities that I really fell in love with Ove. He tried his very hardest to be unlikeable but your just couldn’t help but become enamoured with this unlikely hero.

As a whole, A Man Called Ove tackles the larger issues of loss – loss of loved ones; loss of time and mostly loss of control. Ove strives to right the wrongs that the authorities, his bosses, the man sets for him. As I have said, Ove is a simple man but he knows what it right. And he diligently fights for the right thing throughout the book. You see this grumpy old man open up to the people and possibilities around him and grow; he is warm and loving he just didn’t have a chance to show it.

For anyone unsure about reading this book I would implore you to give it a try. If we are lucky we get to grow old but that doesn’t mean that we become feeble or helpless or unable to make decisions for ourselves. The elderly should be shown compassion and reverence not shot down for being older. This book reminds us to have empathy and respect for those who are older than us. A Man Called Ove – like the older generations around us – should not be ignored. Read this book.

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman is available now.

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